AdventureSmith Specialist Arielle Lightcap writes this National Geographic Quest review as she was among the first to step aboard the 100-guest small ship during its first month sailing in Alaska.

After seeing the National Geographic Quest in person while in Sitka, Alaska, earlier this month, I can confidently say that this ship has exceeded expectations. The Quest is the first new-build in the history of the Lindblad Expeditions-National Geographic alliance. Her inaugural voyage took place on July 29, 2017 in Alaska, after being launched from Washington’s Nichols Brothers Boat Builders, so I was excited to be among the first aboard during her initial month of sailings.

Bow close-up of National Geographic Quest small ship at the dock in Juneau Alaska

The National Geographic Quest will undoubtedly be a favorite in small ship cruising as she continues her sailings in Alaska and down to Costa Rica.

With spacious cabins in every category, a large sun deck an unobstructed, tiered bow and a designated mudroom for expedition gear conveniently located off the stern, the National Geographic Quest will undoubtedly be a favorite in small ship cruising as she continues her sailings in Alaska, then onward to British Columbia and Coastal Washington, Costa Rica and the Panama Canal, Belize, and the Columbia River.

Tiered bow viewing on the National Geographic Quest

All passengers are able to see and hear the speaker no matter where they choose to sit in the lounge.

Consideration for guest experience while on and off the ship has been executed marvelously. The lounge is designed with a podium placed in the center of the room so that all passengers are able to see and hear the speaker no matter where they choose to sit.

Interior lounge of National Geographic Quest with booth seating and podium

The National Geographic Quest also has an impressive fitness room and spa, not commonly found aboard small ships.

When it comes time to disembark the ship for the daily excursions, guests transition through the mudroom where they gear up and fill their water bottles before easily walking from the stern into the Zodiacs.

Stern and skiffs of the National Geographic Quest small ship

All Category 4 cabins have a floor-to-ceiling sliding door that leads to a private balcony.

Cabins aboard the National Geographic Quest have been crafted to cater to a variety of guests’ needs with the Category 5 cabins comfortably accommodating up to three guests (configuration pictured below), and twelve additional cabins with interconnecting doorways, which are great for families. For those wanting some additional private space, all Category 4 cabins have a floor-to-ceiling sliding door that leads to a private balcony.

National Geographic Quest review of rooms showing the category 5 cabin with sleeping for 3 guests

See more images from my time aboard on the AdventureSmith Facebook page. For more information and to book your passage aboard this small ship, visit AdventureSmith’s National Geographic Quest page.

This National Geographic Quest review was written by an AdventureSmith Explorations crew member. Read all AdventureSmith small ship cruise reviews for more trip reports, or contact one of our Adventure Specialists to learn more about these small ship cruises and wilderness adventures: 1-800-728-2875.